Getting Schooled on Surf Fishing!
Jun24

Getting Schooled on Surf Fishing!

Living on the beautiful South Carolina coast for many years has given me plenty of opportunity to enjoy just about all it has to offer. Recently I was on my morning walk on the beach, and it hit me like a rogue wave that I have never been surf fishing. I’m always looking for new outdoor experiences, and that is exactly what I set out to have. I knew I had a lot to learn. (The last thing I wanted to do was hook myself or some other unsuspecting beachgoer when I attempted to cast my line!) Instead of Googling surf fishing, I knew right where to go to get some expert advice. Captain Ron Bailey of Seven Seas Seafood , a true salt fisherman and a man I like to call my friend, was really animated when I told him I wanted to go surf fishing, and he immediately agreed to set me up with a rod and reel and some straight talk on what would be most important to know. I figured out pretty quickly that my “surf-casting outfit” had nothing to do with what I was planning on wearing, but everything to do with balancing my rod, reel, line, and the weight of the lure to make sure everything was in proper proportion for the species I was seeking. As I listened intently to his words of wisdom and his expertise on what items I would need, my mind held on to one bit of advice in particular: “Make sure you bring a comfortable chair.” He laughed! I could tell immediately that a lot of patience would be required. “Because our beaches are flat, with few natural troughs, most fish are attracted to the churning white waters and just outside of the suds. Don’t try to cast your bait to China—you will throw over the fish if you cast too far,” Captain Ron explained. Captain Ron told me that two hours before or after high tide, especially when these times coincide with dawn or dusk, is the best time to surf fish. Fish tend to come in closer to feed at these times. “It doesn’t hurt to look for runoffs or drain drifts coming from land to sea. This additional water flow creates a backwash as it hits the waves and can attract fish,” he further explained. I was getting very excited and I thought I would look through our home library to see what books we had about saltwater fishing. I found a few interesting titles, to say the least. One book in particular was a 1959 Fisherman’s Handbook, and I got a huge laugh...

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Cures for the “Off Season Blues”
Jun22

Cures for the “Off Season Blues”

It’s that time of year for many hunters; we get the case of the blues with hunting season months away from opening.   Many hunters find themselves in that funk of what to do to keep their favorite sport active and alive. To keep my passion for hunting alive, I love to surf the great hunting posts on Facebook and it amazes me how many hunters share this passion.  It is easy to join hunting forums where you can keep the conversation going with hunters everywhere. For me, I love rocking my camo clothes as much as possible. Being a staff member of Prois has given me an opportunity to get the word out about this amazing line of women’s outdoor clothing and gear. After a year of wearing something camo (365 days!), I still like to  wear something such as a scarf, hair tie, etc every chance I get.  Check out these cute sandals I found at Francesca’s  Here are some other ideas that can help: Even if you don’t have acreage, set up deer cameras in your backyard and watch and learn about animals in their habitat.   It is a great family activity. Play fun nature games with the kids –  I found a wonderful outdoor game at Bass Pro called CAMP that is great for ages 4- 68! Set up some “critter” hunting.  Here in SC, hog hunting is year round as well as coyote. This will help the conservation of turkey, quail, and deer. Help a friend repair and maintain deer stands. Practice your turkey calls –  There are really great U-Tube videos to help perfect your calling skills. Pull out some game meat from your freezer and explore wonderful recipes and give thanks for the harvest.  Share with friends. Be sure to wear your “camo apron”! Learn a new skill – how about learning to use a tree climber? That might be ambitious for many of us, but there are so many new skills you can learn. Take up a hobby… I have met several amazing hunters who carry on their outdoor passion throughout the year with beautiful handcrafted wood art, paintings, & writings. Go to the range and fire that gun. Shooting clays is always a great way to keep up your wing shooting skills. Shop for great off season sales at sporting stores. Prois is having amazing summer sales on items you will wish you had when it comes to hunting season.  I love my new Prois Edition Jacket I just got on sale! Organize your hunting clothes and gear. Time to clean your guns?  Now is the time to make...

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Clay Shooting Obsession!
May31

Clay Shooting Obsession!

The woods ring with the sounds of shotgun blasts all around, but you hardly notice. You are one with your shotgun, anticipating the clay to be released and the rush you get with the impact when your shot pattern meets the clay at its apex. The mini fireworks display as the clay disintegrates is the thrill that drives you. Before you have a second to think, another clay is in the air, and your gun follows your eyes’ lead and you keenly set on crushing the clay to complete the pair. Without a doubt, sporting clays has become my latest obsession, and it appears that this is contagious, as my daughter Caroline has caught the bug as well! Over the past month I have had the opportunity to participate in two fundraising tournaments, shooting clay targets with shotguns. Taking lessons prior to the shoots was a necessity. Most people assume that being a hunter means you are naturally at home with shooting clays. That is not the case with me. The few times I shot clays over the years, I found it frustrating and puzzling. That’s because I was truly “winging” it. It wasn’t until I had a couple of formal lessons from some of the best instructors in the business that I finally realized that there is a method to being successful at shooting clays. I was thrilled to meet Elizabeth Lanier of Lanier Shooting Sports this past February, and she got me on track with a lesson when I attended a G.R.I.T.S. (Girls Really Into Shooting) weekend at George Hi Plantation in Garland, North Carolina. Without a doubt, I felt that at last I had solid foundations to work from, and I had a sense of excitement about shooting clays, rather than the apprehension I had felt about it for many years. Two weeks prior to the fundraising events, I took a couple of lessons with Ken Podraza at Back Woods Quail Club in Georgetown, South Carolina and found his instruction to be invaluable as well. Since Caroline has recently joined me in my real estate business (we’ve become Boineau Team Real Estate), she expressed an interest in participating in the Coastal Carolina Association of Realtors shooting fundraiser. Because she had no experience shooting clays, lessons were vital. She is a fast learner, quite competitive, and found herself to be a natural, shooting over 35% in her first tournament. I am so thrilled to have a partner who wants to practice as much as I do. We recently decided to obtain a membership at Back Woods so we can keep improving our shooting skills. Caroline is not a...

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Bacon Wrapped Quail!!
May16

Bacon Wrapped Quail!!

One way to get through the off season blues is to reward yourself with the game you brought home during hunting season, and that is just what we did this past Mother’s Day weekend. Without a second thought, I chose quail to be the centerpiece for our special dinner.  It was even more special as I brought these beautiful game birds back from my hunt at George Hi Plantation in February which was my first all-female hunt weekend. I wanted to put together a beautiful dinner for my mother-in-law, Dotsy who knows her visit to our home is likely to include a game dinner prepared with a traditional southern flair.  She loves it when we use the lovely china she gave us years ago, so it made it a lot of fun to indulge her!  My husband and I decided the menu would consist of bacon wrapped quail, cheese and garlic stone ground yellow grits casserole,  and grilled asparagus.  To make it more festive and to set the mood I chose napkin rings made with lifelike birds and rustic leaf mats.  The inspiration to make the meal as beautiful as possible is the genuine appreciation I feel having been the provider of the food.  I know the table setting is not perfect and I plated the quail without removing the toothpicks.  However, I wanted to share the experience with you and hope you enjoy it for what it is. Below are the instructions for how we prepared this meal.  Hope you enjoy!!   Preparing the quail: Set the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse and pat dry the dressed quail. Salt and pepper the cavity and outside of birds. (Optional) Place a jalapeño pepper cut in half in the cavity. Wrap the birds with a thick quality bacon strip. Take a large toothpick (which has been soaked in water) and secure the bacon. Lightly mist the birds with olive oil or brush with melted butter. Bake the quail at 375 degrees for 15 – 20 minutes. Turn the oven on broil and continue browning 5- 6 minutes or browned to your taste. Remove the quail from the oven and let rest for 5 minutes. Serve!!                                 Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Up da Creek!
May08

Up da Creek!

What a gift to live in Murrells Inlet!  The tidal waters provide a sanctuary for wildlife of all kinds. We have everything anybody would want- boating, fishing, bird watching, people watching and every kind of outdoor water sport you can imagine. Just a few minutes by boat from our house, the famous “Marsh Walk” draws you in with its amazing restaurants and entertainment.  There is fun to be had for all ages!   Live bands, great food and drinks keep visitors happy and our little village is known as “The Seafood Capital of the East”! However, I can’t help but think of the old saying “up da creek without a paddle” living in Murrells Inlet.  I guess its truest meaning is you have a problem!!  The only “problem” some may say is that the creek empties out a low tide and in many areas you will find yourself in trouble if you don’t watch the tides very carefully. At first I thought that low tide and no passage was a not so great, but the absolute peace and quiet you get in return is immeasurable.  No noise from passing boats or jet skies for several hours while the tide is out makes it all worthwhile. However, for those who are not familiar with the tides and creeks, it can be a real problem.  We cringe as we see boats, jet skis, and paddle boarders get hung up at low tide on oyster shells and unsuspecting barefooted boaters walk onto these sharp unforgiving oyster shells.   We have had to rescue many people living here over the years. But in a few hours, the tide is high again and boaters share the waters with the wildlife!  Love my water world!       Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Moments Like This… Guest Post
May04

Moments Like This… Guest Post

  “Move quickly”!  The tall damp grass muffles our foot falls, as we try to avoid an early morning face plant brought on by some unforeseen object in the dark. The sun has just started to illuminate the inky sky, as gobbles echo down the valley. We race toward the avian thunder coming from a roosting tree ahead, praying our movement will go unnoticed. A large oak tree 50 yards out appears to be the perfect end point of our mad scramble. The three of us slide into position like a baseball player stealing home plate. Within minutes (that seem like hours) there is a chorus of hair raising gobbles, pounding heartbeats, a fire red head bobbing through the brilliant sea of green, and an ever so quiet click of a safety being released… My 16 year old niece, Audrey has drawn a turkey hunt in our home state of California. She has asked my husband, Joe and I to join her on the adventure and she let us know that she is determined to drive home with a cooler full of fresh turkey meat! On opening morning of her hunt, the three of us start the 2.5 mile hike under a moonless sky, long before sun up. Our pant legs get soaked from the dew covered grass, as we meander through the dense oak trees and rolling hills. We crest the top of a ridge, plant ourselves against some trees and listen for lonely gobblers still in the roost, broadcasting their position to anything willing to listen. Within minutes we hear one, but it’s a ways off. We grab our gear and the race begins to pinpoint the roosting area. The gobbles become louder as we close the distance in the dark. In time, the morning twilight reveals the lay of the land and thunderous gobbles rumble through the crisp spring air. Who doesn’t love turkey hunting? We glance to the oak tree we want for our set up, lean over to reduce our profile, and sprint to the designated spot. Once there I scramble out in front of us a few yards, quickly set up a lone Avian X hen decoy, and slide back into position next to Audrey. I range several trees and whisper the ranges. I look into Audrey’s eyes and I can see she is ready. Joe strategically sets up about 10 yards behind the two of us and preps the play list. The birds are out of the roost and the chess match begins. Joe calls softly and a few gobblers respond. Time passes and the sequence continues. Joe calls again and the...

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