Moments Like This… Guest Post
May04

Moments Like This… Guest Post

  “Move quickly”!  The tall damp grass muffles our foot falls, as we try to avoid an early morning face plant brought on by some unforeseen object in the dark. The sun has just started to illuminate the inky sky, as gobbles echo down the valley. We race toward the avian thunder coming from a roosting tree ahead, praying our movement will go unnoticed. A large oak tree 50 yards out appears to be the perfect end point of our mad scramble. The three of us slide into position like a baseball player stealing home plate. Within minutes (that seem like hours) there is a chorus of hair raising gobbles, pounding heartbeats, a fire red head bobbing through the brilliant sea of green, and an ever so quiet click of a safety being released… My 16 year old niece, Audrey has drawn a turkey hunt in our home state of California. She has asked my husband, Joe and I to join her on the adventure and she let us know that she is determined to drive home with a cooler full of fresh turkey meat! On opening morning of her hunt, the three of us start the 2.5 mile hike under a moonless sky, long before sun up. Our pant legs get soaked from the dew covered grass, as we meander through the dense oak trees and rolling hills. We crest the top of a ridge, plant ourselves against some trees and listen for lonely gobblers still in the roost, broadcasting their position to anything willing to listen. Within minutes we hear one, but it’s a ways off. We grab our gear and the race begins to pinpoint the roosting area. The gobbles become louder as we close the distance in the dark. In time, the morning twilight reveals the lay of the land and thunderous gobbles rumble through the crisp spring air. Who doesn’t love turkey hunting? We glance to the oak tree we want for our set up, lean over to reduce our profile, and sprint to the designated spot. Once there I scramble out in front of us a few yards, quickly set up a lone Avian X hen decoy, and slide back into position next to Audrey. I range several trees and whisper the ranges. I look into Audrey’s eyes and I can see she is ready. Joe strategically sets up about 10 yards behind the two of us and preps the play list. The birds are out of the roost and the chess match begins. Joe calls softly and a few gobblers respond. Time passes and the sequence continues. Joe calls again and the...

Read More
A Day in The Life of Angie – Make That Call Sing by Angie Kokes
Mar11

A Day in The Life of Angie – Make That Call Sing by Angie Kokes

Growing up in a hunting family I always had access to help and the equipment I needed, but tirelessly found my mind yearning to do everything myself.  I didn’t want to be the girl who had to have her hook baited or birds cleaned by anyone but me.  And my stubbornness to do so has shaped me into the hunter and angler I am today.  I like to call it the self taught by trying all the wrong ways first and then figuring out all the right ways later…chalking that up to my stubborn streak.  However this worked well for me over the years accept in the goose blind. Goose hunting was something that was always done with my dad, brother and their friends and eventually my husband. Since there is a lot of work that goes into goose hunting, blind building, setting decoys, etc., when you’re allowed in the blind the last thing you want to do is screw the hunt up for everyone else, and so I never blew a call.  Well not exactly never, but the few times I did attempt it I was met with unfavorable looks from the other hunters,  and comments like, “you sound like a dying rabbit, you need to go home and practice.”  So I would just sit back and let the masters work the birds and when they brought them down I was the hunter who would shoot and not be heard…at least not heard blowing a call. Fast forward dozens of seasons to my having my own blind.  I still had experienced callers out to hunt several times but on one blustery day with a blizzard starting to howl my husband, brother in law and I gave it a go on our own, all of us basically non-existent in the skills of calling geese department.  By mid morning we had no birds and the guys decided they better stop playing and get home to feed the cattle.  I opted out of actually being responsible and decided I wanted to stay and hunt, I just knew in my heart this was going to be a good day for birds.   They shrugged their shoulders and left mumbling some sarcastic form of good luck with that. I’d been secretly wanting to goose hunt on my own for some time, and now was as good a time as any to let that call screech!  I let the boys get well out of range of any sound I was about to make before I started my  “it’s about time Angie learned to blow a call session.”  Rummaging through the calls I picked out a couple...

Read More
Take a Stand on Treestand Safety!
Sep14

Take a Stand on Treestand Safety!

Ladder Treestand Safety Tips by Dana Sacia, Guest Blogger If you are a bow hunter, you have heard time and time again … Safety first, Safety first, Safety first. You may even know someone that has had a treestand accident. The thought of that happening intimidated me so much that it took me years to climb up and get in one. I realized if I wanted to experience bow hunting from high ground, I was going to have to figure out how to over come this fear. The first thing I needed to do was to become educated on how to be as safe as possible. I wanted to ensure myself memorable and enjoyable hunts for years to come without an accident. It didn’t take long to realize it really is pretty simple. All I had to do was apply a little basic knowledge and become aware of the importance of safety. Once that happened, I was able to enjoy the excitement of hunting from a new view and perspective while remaining safe and sound. Safety Harnesses Wearing a safety vest or full body harness is one of the most important aspects to consider before climbing into a treestand. Statistics show that 30% of bow hunters will experience a fall or accident from lack of safety while hunting out of a ladder stand. Being in a hurry can be the number one result of an accident. As soon as you get into the stand, strap yourself in and then get settled. A strong and sturdy safety rope (or strap) should be attached to both your harness and the tree to prevent you from falling more than 12 inches. See more at:  Summit Journal  Safety harness should fit securely. Good harnesses have shock absorption and are made of highly durable materials. The comfort of safety harness has greatly improved over the last several years. Some brands of safety harnesses include: • Hunter Safety Systems: Contour • Summit Stands: Fast-Back Deluxe • Robinson Outdoors: Tree Spider • Big Game Trees: EZ On • Gorilla: G20 Setting up a Ladder Stand I personally hunt out of a ladder stand so the first thing to consider when preparing to set one up is finding a healthy tree. Try to pick a solid, strong, and heavy tree. Make sure you choose one that is nest free to any animals so you are not interrupting any home. Once you have selected the perfect tree, clean the debris at the base of it. This will eliminate tripping over any rocks or thick brush when you are entering or exiting the stand. It will also show you if...

Read More
Oregon  Bow Huntress – Straight To The Heart!
Aug06

Oregon Bow Huntress – Straight To The Heart!

Opening day of archery bull elk and archery buck deer are less than 20 days away here in Oregon. This will be my first year bowhunting. I wanted to share some of the things that I have learned over the last year while I have been practicing and preparing for my first year bowhunting. If you are new to bowhunting, find a reputable pro-shop that has bows you can shoot. Do not buy a bow just because you like how it looks. You might not like the draw cycle or other aspects of shooting that particular bow. Whichever bow you choose, make sure that it fits YOU and feels comfortable to hold! I have been shooting a Bowtech Carbon Rose for little over a year and have recently switched over to a Bowtech Eva Shockey Signature Series. Make sure your draw length is correct! The pro-shop will have you stretch out your arms with your palms facing forward (do not overstretch). They measure from the tip of your middle finger to the other and divide that number by 2.5. For example, my measurement is 65, so my draw length is 26 inches. Another very important thing is your draw weight; make sure you check your state laws. You must meet minimum weight requirements. If your bow is too easy to pull back, increase your weight. If it is too difficult to pull back, decrease your weight. If you do not meet minimum weight requirements, remember that practice, practice, practice will build up those muscles. Sarah Bowmar has a great video on YouTube you can watch; she shows you how to increase your draw weight. My current draw weight is 47-48 pounds, but I plan to get that up to 50 pounds soon (legal archery bull elk minimum weight is 50 pounds in the state of Oregon). Make sure your anchor point is consistent. The anchor point is where your hand, release and face all meet when you are at full draw. You can have a kisser button added to help you find the correct spot, normally the corner of your mouth. Grip is another thing that needs to be consistent. Some people only have the grip touching the fleshy part of their palm and have fingers pointed out straight (not my favorite way). Another way is to have the grip touching the fleshy part of the palm and very lightly place the fingertips on the opposite side of the grip. The third way is to have the grip touching the fleshy part of the palm and having your knuckles make a 45-degree angle parallel to the grip. Choose accessories...

Read More
Guest Blog: Carman Brown Meets “Mr. Tom”!!!!
May13

Guest Blog: Carman Brown Meets “Mr. Tom”!!!!

  In 2000, I started dating Tommy Brown, who is by far the greatest turkey hunter that I know. Tommy is an extreme hunter, woodsman & naturalist, as well as a fine Southern Gentleman. When turkey season came around, he invited me to go turkey hunting with him. I was only a spectator but my first turkey hunting experience is still very vivid to me and one of my most cherished times in the woods. We went into the deep swamp before dawn and Tommy did a Barred Owl call & a gobbler gobbled right back at him. The turkey’s gobble, which I had never heard before, sounded like nearby thunder. We sat down on our stools and got into position. As Tommy was getting organized with his calls, I watched a baby squirrel playing 5 feet in front of me. I had the sense something was watching me and looked up into a tree about 10 feet to my right where I saw a Great Horned Owl staring at the baby squirrel. I sat extremely still with amazement. Then the owl soared down, grabbed the small squirrel with his talons took it back to the limb on which he had been perched and threw the squirrel back like a thirsty cowboy doing a shot of liquor in a saloon. The owl spun his head and peered at me like “You are next!” About the time the owl flew away, the gobbling started again, yet this time it was much closer and literally made the ground tremble! There he was, the most amazing bird I had ever seen with a brilliant red, white and blue head. And as I was admiring all his splendor as he strutted and gobbled out in front of us he quickly met his demise. I WAS SOLD ON THIS TURKEY HUNTING THING! Without ever shooting a gun, I felt as though I was obsessed with wild turkey hunting. A week later I started learning to shoot a shotgun with a turkey drawn on a piece of plywood in the yard. I bagged my first bird days later. We hunt in the deep swamp surrounded by cypress and tupelo trees. And every spring I find myself venturing into areas that I cannot fathom that I am exploring. Tommy is an amazing hunter, more adventurous than I sometimes like, walking us a half a mile or more into what I feel confident is a moccasin-infested area. I pray along the way as I wear my snake boots asking the Lord to keep the serpents away from us & us out of all danger. Yet, each time...

Read More
Meet Katie! Huntress and Aspiring Surgeon!  Her Story…
Mar04

Meet Katie! Huntress and Aspiring Surgeon! Her Story…

Career Goals:  My dream is to be a Neurosurgeon or Cardiothoracic surgeon. I love learning about the anatomy of the body and how it works physiologically. I admire and respect doctors because they devote themselves and their lives to helping people. They spend years honing skills, gaining knowledge and developing a character worthy of trust and respect. This is what I desire to do with my life. School: Horry Georgetown Technical College Graduate this May with two degrees- Associates in Science and Associates in Art Extracurricular Activities: Involved in national honor society called Phi Theta Kappa. I am an officer in our school’s chapter. I’m very proud to be involved in Phi Theta Kappa because I have gotten so very much out of it. I’ve developed organizational and leadership skills I never would have otherwise. I’ve been on free trips to New Mexico and North Carolina, and I will be going to Columbia, SC and Washington D.C. soon! I’m also president of the new science club at HGTC. I love science, so I’m very excited about this club becoming active at school! Hobbies: In the summer I love to tan, read in the sun and you can usually find me near a large body of water! I love to swim! One of my biggest joys of the summer months would be going to Fork Retch and seeing the kids at  Wildlife Action. That has been my joy every summer for 6 years now! In the fall and winter months, my family heats our home with a wood stove. So we cut a lot of fallen trees and bust that wood up into pieces that will fit into the heater. I’ve become pretty good at chopping wood, if I do say so myself. I love spending that time with my family, and I also spend a great deal of time in front of that heater when it’s cold outside. I duck hunt when school permits me to. I love the swamp during the winter, especially at sunrise. I used to write poems about the swamp when I was younger because I thought it was so beautiful. Hunting: I’ve been hunting with my uncle, Buddy Piner, since I was 8 years old. I started duck hunting in the local swamps in Gresham with him, and soon after he took me to the Outer Banks in North Carolina. Steve Goodwin, a good friend of Uncle Buddy’s, was our guide. I’ll never forget that first trip because he let me drive the boat (we were flying at a high speed of about 2 miles per hour, but that was fast to me). We’ve gone...

Read More
Click Me!

Subscribe for a chance to win cool camo and other hunting gifts!

%d bloggers like this: