Floundering Around… A day on the Inlet
Sep07

Floundering Around… A day on the Inlet

Living on the salt marshes in Murrells Inlet offers the perfect opportunity to fish the tidal waters. The summer months are passing by much too quickly, and soon it will be hunting season, which will abruptly put an end to any fishing excursions. So, we set out on a warm late summer afternoon for some time on the water. After gearing up at Perry’s Bait Shop, we set out with two bait pails full of live finger mullets, mud minnows, and fresh cut mullet, hoping to catch some redfish or maybe a shark. I am always up for an outdoor adventure, and my hopes were high to reel in something exciting and perhaps make a fresh fish dinner! A short boat ride to the jetties and the channel was exhilarating, as we sliced through the shimmering waters flanked by fluorescent green marsh grasses. The crashing waves at the jetties reminded us that the calmer waters were now behind us. Fishing by boat at the jetties can be challenging, and we totally respect the dangers that lurk everywhere. The currents, along with the wind and waves kicked up by the heavy boat traffic can cause anchors to break loose, and boats can quickly end up impaled on the rocks. I always keep a sharp eye on the rocks and make sure we are not drifting slowly toward them. From experience, we feel this is the perfect spot, as a lot of bait congregates there attracting the big reds and other sport fish. We always get as close as we can but always with a margin for error in mind. We rocked with the waves and the blaring classic rock music streaming from our radio as we settled in on what we thought would be the honey hole. We were excited when my hubby, Trippett caught a flounder and I caught a black sea bass soon after anchoring on the north side of the jetties. We had the jetties mostly to ourselves, with only a boat here and there that stopped by for a brief time. No one landed any fish that we could see. I was annoyed when I hooked up with a couple of toadfish, since they are horrible to have to take off a hook. We pretty much drowned the rest of the bait after that! After a few hours, we decided to get on back to the house. Trippett, my “in-house photographer,’’ snapped a quick photo of me with my single quarry, and I was excited about making a nice fish dinner that evening with the flounder and the black sea bass. In order to make the...

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Bacon Wrapped Quail!!
May16

Bacon Wrapped Quail!!

One way to get through the off season blues is to reward yourself with the game you brought home during hunting season, and that is just what we did this past Mother’s Day weekend. Without a second thought, I chose quail to be the centerpiece for our special dinner.  It was even more special as I brought these beautiful game birds back from my hunt at George Hi Plantation in February which was my first all-female hunt weekend. I wanted to put together a beautiful dinner for my mother-in-law, Dotsy who knows her visit to our home is likely to include a game dinner prepared with a traditional southern flair.  She loves it when we use the lovely china she gave us years ago, so it made it a lot of fun to indulge her!  My husband and I decided the menu would consist of bacon wrapped quail, cheese and garlic stone ground yellow grits casserole,  and grilled asparagus.  To make it more festive and to set the mood I chose napkin rings made with lifelike birds and rustic leaf mats.  The inspiration to make the meal as beautiful as possible is the genuine appreciation I feel having been the provider of the food.  I know the table setting is not perfect and I plated the quail without removing the toothpicks.  However, I wanted to share the experience with you and hope you enjoy it for what it is. Below are the instructions for how we prepared this meal.  Hope you enjoy!!   Preparing the quail: Set the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse and pat dry the dressed quail. Salt and pepper the cavity and outside of birds. (Optional) Place a jalapeño pepper cut in half in the cavity. Wrap the birds with a thick quality bacon strip. Take a large toothpick (which has been soaked in water) and secure the bacon. Lightly mist the birds with olive oil or brush with melted butter. Bake the quail at 375 degrees for 15 – 20 minutes. Turn the oven on broil and continue browning 5- 6 minutes or browned to your taste. Remove the quail from the oven and let rest for 5 minutes. Serve!!                                 Share this:FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogleRedditLike this:Like...

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Hot Gobble Soup on a Cold Wintry Night!
Mar16

Hot Gobble Soup on a Cold Wintry Night!

In just a few more days. we will be out hunting turkeys, so  I checked the freezer and saw that we had two large packs of turkey breast meat from last March.  The weather is cold tonight with temps expected to go to the mid 20’s which is very cold for a night in March in South Carolina.  What could be better than wild turkey soup with wild rice?   Nothing except organic vegetables, spices, and wild rice was used to celebrate this beautiful bounty!  What an amazing dinner we had!   I tried a different approach to making the soup and was happy with the results.   Check out this recipe: Ingredients: Turkey breast meat cut in into chunks 4  carrots 4 stalks of celery 1 large onion 6 cloves of  garlic- crushed in large hunks 1  can of diced tomatoes 1 carton of chicken broth low sodium organic 4 cups of water Fresh sprigs of parsley Spices:  salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, tarragon, rosemary, onion powder, garlic salt- to taste! I tried something different – I tossed the turkey chunks with olive oil and seasoned them with rosemary, salt and pepper,  I roasted them in the oven for about 15 minutes so that they were partially cooked.   I sautéed the onions, carrots, garlic, and celery in olive oil until translucent.  I added all the ingredients except the wild rice into the crockpot and cooked for 4 hours on high.  I added the wild rice the last hour.   The soup had a fresh, aromatic, and hearty appeal.  My hubby said it was the best wild turkey soup he has ever had and I have to agree!  We are so inspired to have a very successful turkey hunting season this Spring.  Thank you Mr. Tom!           Share this:FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogleRedditLike this:Like...

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Hot Chocolate for Adults! Guest Recipe
Dec14

Hot Chocolate for Adults! Guest Recipe

Some of our hunting seasons in Maine start and end in chilly or downright frigid weather. After I climb down from the stand, walk through the woods and up the hill through deep snow and arrive back at camp, I want something warm to drink even before food. It’s too late in the day to drink coffee and sleep well. Hot chocolate is nice but after hours in the cold, an adult beverage is what I have in mind. A shot of Irish crème makes a mug of hot chocolate is delicious but I wanted something new. I stumbled onto a blog with a recipe for hot chocolate and wine. It didn’t sound good at first. Hot wine? Turns out it’s incredible. Choose your favorite red wine and chocolate. If dark chocolate isn’t your thing you can use milk chocolate. It’s worth the few minutes it takes to make hot chocolate instead of using an instant mix but if that’s what you have on hand until you shop, use it and make it rich. This recipe makes enough for two mugs of Dark Red Hot Chocolate. Halve or double as needed but make each mug fresh. Enjoy! Chef Robin strikes again: Hot Chocolate Recipes – Dark Chocolate & Red Wine Course Drinks Cuisine Beverages Servings- 4 INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 cups whole milk 1 1/2 cups red wine Use your favorite 1 cup dark chocolate chopped or chips 1 tsp vanilla pinch cinnamon or nutmeg as a topping 1/2 cup whipping cream whipped separately as a topping Hot Chocolate Recipes – Dark Chocolate & Red Wine INSTRUCTIONS Combine the milk, wine and chocolate in a double boiler. Warm until the chocolate melts, scraping the bottom of the pan often to keep the chocolate from burning. When the chocolate is melted, remove from heat and whisk briskly to make sure the chocolate is thoroughly incorporated. Stir in the vanilla. Pour into mugs and top with whipped cream. You can add to the richness of this drink by grating a bit of chocolate on top of the cream, or dust with cinnamon or nutmeg.     Share this:FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogleRedditLike this:Like...

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Lone Doe Osso Buco Recipe by Margie Nelson

Margie’s  Osso Buco Recipe Shanks cut 1 1/2 inches thick from one whitetail or mule deer flour and salt and pepper for dredging (I use a little Cavender’s greek seasoning) Avacado or olive oil 1/2 Cup diced Pancetta one diced sweet onion 4 cloves garlic (I put them through a garlic press) 4 medium carrots diced 4 sticks celery diced 5 sprigs of fresh thyme 2 springs of fresh rosemary 2 springs of fresh oregano 28 oz can of diced fire roasted tomatoes 1 cup red wine 5 cups chicken stock Dredge the shanks in flour and seasoning and brown in the oil on all sides. Remove and place in the bottom of large roaster. Add more oil to the same pan and add pancetta, onion, garlic, carrots, celery and cook until slightly tender. Using a slotted spoon take out of the pan and put over the top of the meat. Add the wine and chicken stock to the pan with the fresh herbs and simmer for about 15 minutes. While simmering add the can of tomatoes to the rest of the dish in the roaster Remove the herbs and pour the liquid over the all other ingredients. If the liquid doesn’t cover everything, add more stock. Put the lid on the Roaster, set at 250F and walk away from this for about 4 hours and then turn it down to 150 for another 4-5 hours. Fall apart goodness in your mouth right here. You can serve this with mashed potatoes, rice, risotto, polenta…what ever floats your boat! And if you’re feeling really fancy, and want traditional Osso Buco top this all off with. Gremolata 1 bunch of parsley, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped zest of one lemon, finely chopped Serves…a bunch of hungry folks! ENJOY!! The Hunt… Last year was a banner year hunting…for my friends! I took 6 different fellas hunting over several outings on some private, but mostly all BLM land and they harvested two nice bull elk, two mature cow elk, a tender calf and one very nice 5×5 whitetail buck. I got a doe! A tender yummy, didn’t know I was there doe! Here in Montana the elk are plentiful and the hunters are too. BLM lands have a reputation for elk being there, and they certainly are by the hundreds. But then that also brings out every kind of hunter.  So, I went to private land for a last ditch effort. I have friends that have always been gracious to allow us to hunt on their property and the elk were around because shots were being fired at the neighboring State...

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Wild Boar Roast – The Harvest
Sep17

Wild Boar Roast – The Harvest

On my recent visit home to Pennsylvania, I brought with us, this beautiful wild boar roast.  My husband, Trippett harvested this perfect 165 lb sow in January, and this was the first time I had ever cooked wild boar.  I truly just went with my instincts on how to prepare it.  With no time to look up recipes, I simply covered it with virgin olive oil and rubbed it generously with course sea salt.  I used my sister, Lucie’s Mediterranean mix of multicolored peppercorns, fresh rosemary and embellished by a fresh bay leaf harvest from my Aunt Rosie’s garden in San Jose, CA.    Next, I placed the roast in my Mom’s treasured electric roasting oven.  I put a cup of organic apple cider vinegar and two cups of water in the roasting pan.  I set the temperature at 375 and let it roast!  Here is a great reference for cooking times  for pork roasts – I have to say, everyone said it was one of the best roasts and it was particularly wonderful since none of my relatives had ever had wild boar. The following day, Lucie made this amazing soup using the left over bone.  She covered the bone in water and  simmered it along with fresh carrots, celery, onions, and garlic which had been gently sautéed in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and cracked pepper.  Lucie loves bay leaves and always adds them to her soups.  Lastly, just before serving, she added fresh  sautéed zucchini to the soup.  What a beautiful way to give thanks for the harvest by not wasting anything.       Share this:FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogleRedditLike this:Like...

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