Take a Stand on Treestand Safety!
Sep14

Take a Stand on Treestand Safety!

Ladder Treestand Safety Tips by Dana Sacia, Guest Blogger If you are a bow hunter, you have heard time and time again … Safety first, Safety first, Safety first. You may even know someone that has had a treestand accident. The thought of that happening intimidated me so much that it took me years to climb up and get in one. I realized if I wanted to experience bow hunting from high ground, I was going to have to figure out how to over come this fear. The first thing I needed to do was to become educated on how to be as safe as possible. I wanted to ensure myself memorable and enjoyable hunts for years to come without an accident. It didn’t take long to realize it really is pretty simple. All I had to do was apply a little basic knowledge and become aware of the importance of safety. Once that happened, I was able to enjoy the excitement of hunting from a new view and perspective while remaining safe and sound. Safety Harnesses Wearing a safety vest or full body harness is one of the most important aspects to consider before climbing into a treestand. Statistics show that 30% of bow hunters will experience a fall or accident from lack of safety while hunting out of a ladder stand. Being in a hurry can be the number one result of an accident. As soon as you get into the stand, strap yourself in and then get settled. A strong and sturdy safety rope (or strap) should be attached to both your harness and the tree to prevent you from falling more than 12 inches. See more at:  Summit Journal  Safety harness should fit securely. Good harnesses have shock absorption and are made of highly durable materials. The comfort of safety harness has greatly improved over the last several years. Some brands of safety harnesses include: • Hunter Safety Systems: Contour • Summit Stands: Fast-Back Deluxe • Robinson Outdoors: Tree Spider • Big Game Trees: EZ On • Gorilla: G20 Setting up a Ladder Stand I personally hunt out of a ladder stand so the first thing to consider when preparing to set one up is finding a healthy tree. Try to pick a solid, strong, and heavy tree. Make sure you choose one that is nest free to any animals so you are not interrupting any home. Once you have selected the perfect tree, clean the debris at the base of it. This will eliminate tripping over any rocks or thick brush when you are entering or exiting the stand. It will also show you if...

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Oregon  Bow Huntress – Straight To The Heart!
Aug06

Oregon Bow Huntress – Straight To The Heart!

Opening day of archery bull elk and archery buck deer are less than 20 days away here in Oregon. This will be my first year bowhunting. I wanted to share some of the things that I have learned over the last year while I have been practicing and preparing for my first year bowhunting. If you are new to bowhunting, find a reputable pro-shop that has bows you can shoot. Do not buy a bow just because you like how it looks. You might not like the draw cycle or other aspects of shooting that particular bow. Whichever bow you choose, make sure that it fits YOU and feels comfortable to hold! I have been shooting a Bowtech Carbon Rose for little over a year and have recently switched over to a Bowtech Eva Shockey Signature Series. Make sure your draw length is correct! The pro-shop will have you stretch out your arms with your palms facing forward (do not overstretch). They measure from the tip of your middle finger to the other and divide that number by 2.5. For example, my measurement is 65, so my draw length is 26 inches. Another very important thing is your draw weight; make sure you check your state laws. You must meet minimum weight requirements. If your bow is too easy to pull back, increase your weight. If it is too difficult to pull back, decrease your weight. If you do not meet minimum weight requirements, remember that practice, practice, practice will build up those muscles. Sarah Bowmar has a great video on YouTube you can watch; she shows you how to increase your draw weight. My current draw weight is 47-48 pounds, but I plan to get that up to 50 pounds soon (legal archery bull elk minimum weight is 50 pounds in the state of Oregon). Make sure your anchor point is consistent. The anchor point is where your hand, release and face all meet when you are at full draw. You can have a kisser button added to help you find the correct spot, normally the corner of your mouth. Grip is another thing that needs to be consistent. Some people only have the grip touching the fleshy part of their palm and have fingers pointed out straight (not my favorite way). Another way is to have the grip touching the fleshy part of the palm and very lightly place the fingertips on the opposite side of the grip. The third way is to have the grip touching the fleshy part of the palm and having your knuckles make a 45-degree angle parallel to the grip. Choose accessories...

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